Cat, Rainstorm and a Big Problem!

Not the Lost Cat

Not the Lost Cat

I wanted to tell the story of what happened to me last weekend. I went to a friend’s house for some munchies. As we were sitting out on the back deck… we noticed a couple raindrops. Then we noticed that the cat was no longer lounging with us on the deck. Nor was he in the yard…

As the rain got heavier, my friends and I walked around the yard and up and down the street yelling the cat’s name. I was nervous because, as most of you know, I don’t work psychically with lost animals—I always tell people that is it just something I am not good at. I was worried that my “talents” (or lack thereof) would be called upon and I didn’t want to let my friends down. As we continued searching, we donned raingear and umbrellas to protect us from massive thunder and lightening.

In all my dripping wetness I thought that even though it’s not something I am good at—I should probably try to connect with the cat anyway. As soon as I connected, I heard “Rrrrreeeeeeooooowwwww!” in my head and saw a picture of him crouching very low under something. He was not a happy camper. After all, this was more of a backyard-on-the-deck cat than an outdoor cat. He had certainly never been in any type of rainstorm! Psychically, I “knew” he was close to the home and that he was ok. I wanted him to tell me exactly where he was, but I doubted my lost-animal-finding abilities. After feeling his initial anger at being in the rain, I asked him if he was near the house. He told me he was under the house. I asked him under the front or the back of the house and explained that the front was toward the street and the back toward the yard. He said the front.

I went to the front of the house. I looked at the stairs leading up to the front door—no, they were cement, no way to be “under the house.” I looked along the front edge of the house—it was a secure foundation—no way to be under. I asked him again “under the house?” “YES” “Under this house?” “Yes, Danielle, I am under this house, right here!” I stood there having this conversation with him for 15 minutes while I could hear my friends trampling through the bushes yelling his name through the downpour. The two of us, we fought—like cat and human-not-understanding-cat. I explained the front vs the back of the house again, I tried to clarify that it was “this” house again. We fought and fought. I just couldn’t understand how he could be under the front of the house when that looked physically impossible to me. Wow, I thought, I was right! I really can’t find lost animals!

Then, just as I was losing hope I heard it. “We found him!” And there he was: under the shed, toward the front. Just like he told me. Moral of my story? No matter what that little voice in your head says, it’s a good idea to go ahead and try what you think you are not good at. You may learn something. Just like I did. I learned that to a cat a shed is a house. 😉

6 replies
  1. Kerri
    Kerri says:

    Love this story! It’s refreshing to know that even someone as gifted as you can doubt your abilities now and then. But, then also give it a go anyway and teach yourself to trust. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  2. Ginny Williams
    Ginny Williams says:

    Can you hear me laughing, Danielle? Now I’m wondering how many times Hobo has *thought* he was being crystal clear when trying to communciate with us. Do our animals think they are the smart ones and we are the simpletons? P.S. Love that you dove right into your new blog!

    Reply
  3. Sue Robinson
    Sue Robinson says:

    So glad that you did this. I have never been on a blog before, but if you can do this so can I! Loved the story, and like everyone else, its nice to know that a little doubt can creep into your mind sometimes too.

    Can’t wait to talk to you this afternoon!

    Reply
  4. debbie calderon
    debbie calderon says:

    I can totally see you standing there in the rain debating with that cat, OMG too funny:) I am glad all turned out well…
    how fun is this blog with stories like that!!!

    Reply

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